2021 Lemon Aid New Car Reviews - SUVs

SUVs: MicroCompact - MidSize - Luxury - All-Terrain

When the Sport Utility Vehicle trend began, most vehicles in the segment were truck-based, body-on-frame vehicles. Most SUVs have morphed into car-based Crossover Utility Vehicles (CUVs). CUVs look like trucks, but  most feature space-efficient unibody construction and drive like cars, which is no surprise as many share the same platforms as passenger cars made by their respective manufacturers. Not only has the segment grown, it has segmented as well. Lemon-Aid has expanded the SUV section over the years, reflecting the growth of the segment as well as new categories within it. With Micro, Compact, MidSize, Luxury and All-terrain, Lemon-Aid covers five distinct categories of SUV for 2021. 

The CUV format has moved into bigger and bigger vehicles. The Chevrolet Traverse, Dodge Durango, Ford Explorer, Honda Pilot, GMC Acadia, Infiniti QX60, Mazda CX-9, Nissan Pathfinder and Toyota Highlander, all have three rows of seats and ample cargo space, if not necessarily at the same time.

The newest trend in the CUV market is the Micro segment, which takes a popular format in a smaller direction, enhancing both affordability and making the vehicle more practical for congested urban habitats. 

Truck-based SUVs, once at the core of the market, have been pushed to the margins of the segment. The Jeep Wrangler and the Toyota 4Runner are the last quasi-affordable body-on-frame SUVs still available. Impressive towing capacity and astounding off-road capabilities are the key advantages that the truck-based vehicles have over the more common CUVs.

Micro CUVs
This segment is dormant for 2021, with no changes of note.    

Compact CUVs
Compact CUVs represent the bulk of sales in the crossover segment. The Nissan Rogue is the only new model for the 2021 model year, but the new-generation Hyundai Tucson went on sale in the spring of 2021 as a 2022 model, as did the conventional version of the Mitsubishi Outlander.   

Midsize CUVs
The 2021 Kia Sorento, now exclusively three-row, migrated from the compact to the mid-size crossover segment for 2021.   

Chevrolet Equinox  Hyundai Santa Fe  Kia Sportage  Nissan Rogue 
Ford Escape  Hyundai Tucson  Mazda CX-30  Subaru Forester 
GMC Terrain  Jeep Cherokee  Mazda CX-5  Toyota RAV4 
Honda CRV  Jeep Compass  Mitsubishi Eclipse Cross  Volkswagen Tiguan 
  Kia Seltos  Mitsubishi Outlander   

 

2021 Chevrolet Equinox/GMC Terrain

 

What’s new
GM announced 2022 versions of both these nameplates that never materialized but these 2021 models did. Reduced model range for 2021.

Comments

The base engine is a 170 horsepower 1.5L turbo four, with a 2L turbo four with 252 horsepower, available on the Terrain only. The 1.5L is hooked up to a conventional six-speed automatic transmission, with the stout 2L attached to a nine-speed automatic.
The overall elegance of the Equinox is undermined by its busy frontal treatment and side embellishments that do little than impart visual discord. That said, the bright detailing around the windows is very well judged. The cabin of the Equinox reflects the current School of Chevrolet design ethos, with a dashboard that looks lifted directly from the Malibu sedan. The rest of the interior, with pleasing shapes, some attractive colour combinations and matte finished hard surfaces, is very stylish. The dashboard of the Equinox is stocked with clear instruments and simple, logical controls. There is ample rear legroom and cargo space inside the Equinox. The front seats are comfortable but the small voids in the lower outboard rear seat backrest, meant to permit easy seat folding, leave some occupants feeling unsupported. The Terrain is a rather bland design that lacks the distinctive "trucky" visual punch of its predecessor. The Equinox is still built in Canada but the Terrain is imported from Mexico. GM notes the towing capacity for the 1.5L turbo version of this platform is 680 kilograms (1500 lbs).  

Pricing

Equinox : only the 1,5 L turbo returns for 2021 in LS, LT and Premier trims. All-wheel drive is standard on the Premier trim and a $2400 option on the LS and LT models. Moving up from the LS to the LT brings deep tint glass, xenon headlamps, a power driver's seat and a few minor items, at a reasonable price. The range-topping Premier model includes blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors, rear parking sonar, leather seating, a memory system for the driver's seat and mirrors and a variety of other comfort and convenience items, at a bargain price. Forward collision warning, including for pedestrians, autonomous emergency braking and lane departure warnings are standard as is a lane keep assist system. Blind spot and rear cross traffic is standard on the Premier trim and optional as part of the $2195 Confidence and Convenience package on the LT. Only the SLT version of the Terrain returned initially for 2021 but other models were promised. Front-wheel drive is standard with all-wheel drive being a $2400 option. The GMC Pro Safety Plus package offers blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors and adaptive cruise control, for just $995.
The Equinox is an excellent lease value for 2021.

Reliability
New vehicle, not rated. GM new cars generate fewer complaints than they used to.  

Specifications


Body Style:  4SW
Occupants: 2/3
Engines:
1.5L-4 T  (170 HP)*, 2L‑4  T (252 HP) 

Transmissions: 6A* , 9A 


Drive Layout: Front-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*


City Fuel Economy:  9.4L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy:  8.0L/100 km

Active Safety Features:  Equinox: Standard forward collision warning, including pedestrians, autonomous emergency braking, a lane departure warning and a lane keep assist system. Optional adaptive cruise control, blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings. Terrain: Standard forward collision warning, including pedestrians and autonomous emergency braking. Optional blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors as well as active cruise control.  


Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000
Current Generation Debut:  2018
Country of Origin: Canada (Equinox), Mexico (Terrain)

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Headlight: M

 

NHTSA Rating:


2021 Ford Escape

 

What’s new
A myriad of package and content shuffles. Leather upholstery is now optional on the Titanium trim. Ford Co-Pilot360 Assist have gained a +, with lane centering device and road sign recognition. Wireless cellphone charging is optional on the SEL and Titanium trims. A plug-in hybrid was announced last year but was quietly withdrawn but may make it to the market for 2021.

Comments
Rounded forms, including a Porsche-like front end, does not win the Escape any originality prizes but is attractive nonetheless. The cabin is a very conservative design and very much in the current Ford styling idiom. On the Titanium trim, the driver faces a transistor film technology gauge cluster, a large info-screen dominates the top centre of the dashboard and the climate and audio controls are straightforward. A rotary dial gear selector replaces the traditional mechanical one used previously. Except for the unattractive faux wood trim, the cabin materials are quite attractive. Cabin and cargo space, tight on the previous Escape, are now class competitive. 
The familiar 2L turbo four returns for 2020, but the new base engine is a 1.5L three-cylinder turbo engine that produces 180 horsepower. Ford discontinued its Escape hybrid when it launched the ill-fated and unpopular C-Max, but a conventional hybrid returned for 2020 and Ford announced, but then withdrew a PHEV version of the Escape. The conventional hybrid model employs a 2.5L normally aspirated four as well as electric motors to furnish 198 total system horsepower. Ford will evntually market a PHEV (plug-in hybrid) variant which is rated at 209 horsepower. Power reaches the the wheels via a conventional eight-speed automatic transmission on the gasoline models and an electronic CVT on the hybrids. 
Driven briefly in 2L form, the Escape is fast, flexible, and is more refined than many of the 2L turbos powering luxury brands. The lusty 2L four is hooked up to a conventional hydraulic eight-speed automatic transmission that is well matched to the power characteristics of the engine. The steering of the Escape is light but precise and the ride-handling compromise arrived at by Ford reflects a lot of hard work.
The APA had an opportunity to drive a new-generation Escape powered by the segment-first three-cylinder engine. With 180 horsepower, the 1.5 T accelerates with vigour, revs eagerly and cruises at low revs. While the engine really delivers in terms of fuel economy, smoothness is another matter. Around town, the engine sounds like a quiet diesel but is mechanically smooth as it revs. The harmonic imbalances inherent with the three-cylinder layout are most evident in the 1500 to 2000 rpm range, which corresponds with top-gear operation at most posted speed limits. Most passengers asked what the sonic rumbling was, aware that Escape had an unusual engine. Certainly the new 1.5L triple is not as smooth as the 1.5L turbo four that was the mainstream engine in the Escape last year. Turning up the audio system does not eliminate the the imbalance as it is felt as well as heard. The eight-speed automatic transmission seeks the highest possible gear, a common strategy to log the best fuel economy possible on U.S. government fuel economy tests. The transmission upshifts smoothly and downshifts eagerly. Ford will have to work harder to eliminate the sonic rumbling of the 1.5L three but could have also altered gearing to get the engine out of its rumbly rev. zone at most posted speed limits. The auto-start system can be turned off but must be cancelled each time the Escape was re-started. Instead of restarting when the driver lifts their foot from the brake, Ford requires the driver to place their foot on the gas pedal to get the engine moving again. The automatic transmission has no creep feature when in Drive, requiring the gas pedal to be pushed to move when maneuvering the vehicle at low speeds. Observed fuel economy of 10.3L/100 km in mild, late spring conditions, was no better than four-cylinder competitors. 
Like its 2L showroom mate, the 1.5L Escape is very well sorted for a mainstream crossover. Ford has arrived as a pleasant ride-handling compromise. Steering is nicely weighted and quick, but does feel just slightly nervous at highway speeds. 
The interior of our heavily optionned SEL model (leather, dual-panel sunroof and navigation) was equipped so comprehensively that there is no real reason to move up to the Titanium trim. The interior is generally very well presented but Ford should have spent a bit more money on the analogue gauges in mainstream models and also on the faux alloy trim, which looks decidedly faux. With comfortable seats and abundant space, the Escape is a worthy travel capsule for full-sized adults. Cargo space is ample. The Escapes air-conditioning works well enough and both the seat heaters and heated steering wheel warm very quickly. Towing capacity ranges from 690 kilograms (1500 lbs.) to 1587 kilograms (3500 lbs.), depending on the powertrain.   

Pricing
Only the gasoline 2L Titanium has standard all-wheel drive; which costs $1500 on all other trims and drivetrains. With the 1,5 L engine, moving from the S to the SE adds alloy wheels, heated front seats, the SYNC3 iOs-Android cellphone and Keyless Go, and is very good value. Migrating to the SEL adds, among other things, a power tailgate, a power driver's seat, heated steering wheel and a dual-zone climate system, and is keenly priced if you like the equipment. Stepping up to the Titanium adds a TFT gauge package, B&O audio equipment, L.E.D. headlamps, navigation, self parking and Co-Pilot Assist+ (adaptive cruise with stop-and-go), is a bargain, even before you add in the 2 L engine upgrade. Opting for the hybrid powertrain costs $800 on the SE and $700 on the SEL. The Titanium hybrid is $1000 cheaper than the hybrid, but the gas Titanium is powered by the much more powerful 2L, four-cylinder engine. No pricing information exists at this time about the the PHEV version of the hybrid that was quietly withdrawn last year. 
The very late arrival of the 2021 Escape makes it impossible to assess lease value. 

Reliability
Reliability is unknown on this all-new vehicle. The 2L turbo is a known quantity but the new 1.5L turbo triple, the hybrid and the new eight-speed automatic transmission, are unproven. The its first few years of production, the previous Escape was rated well below average for reliability.  

Specifications


Body Style:  4SW
Occupants: 2/3
Engines:
1.5L-3 T  (180 HP)*, 2L‑4 T (250 HP),  2.5L-4 H (198 HP)

Transmissions: 8A*, CVT (hybrids) 
Drive Layout: Front-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*

City Fuel Economy:  9.0L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy:  7.6L/100 km

Active Safety Features: Standard forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors. Optional adaptive cruise control with stop and go and lane centering.  


Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000
Current Generation Debut:  2020
Country of Origin:  United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Headlight: M

 

NHTSA Rating:


2021 Honda CR-V

 

What’s new
No changes of note for 2021, the fifth and likely last year for the current CR-V 

Performance
The 1.5L turbo four and CVT is quick enough, it is noisy and the CVT exacerbates the noise as it uses a lot of revs to get the CR-V moving, which is a bit stressful on the driver. Handling is sound but uninvolving and the ride can get a touch choppy on rough pavement. Precise steering and strong braking.  
Spacious interior with abundant rear seat legroom. The front seats are comfortable, as is the rear seat. Easy to scan gauges but the infotainment controls are designed more for looks than ease of use.

Comments
The CR-V is powered by a 1.5L turbo four that produces a stout 190 horsepower in the CR-V. A CVT is the sole transmission available. Most buyers will pick all-wheel drive, but a front-wheel drive LX trim variant be available to advertise a low MSRP and also meet the needs of customers who like the ride height, space and versatility of the CR-V but do not need all-wheel drive or too many frills. Towing capacity is listed at 680 kilograms ((1500lbs.).

Pricing

With heated seats, remote staring, the iOS/android cellphone interface, deep-tint glass, heated front seats and alloy wheels, the base LX is well equipped. All-wheel drive, standard on other trims, is a $2618 option on the LX. All-wheel drive is the overwhelming choice of CR-V buyers. The Sport upgrade adds a power driver's seat, heated steering wheel, sunroof, a passenger side view camera, a power tailgate and an array of additional equipment, is a stand out bargain. Moving up to the EX-L includes leather seating, an upgraded audio system, heated rear seats, and a power passenger's seat, and is priced to reflect the value of its additional content and is popular with buyers as it offers leather without having to move up to the Touring range-topper. The Touring, with blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors, L.E.D. headlamps, a dual-panel sunroof, an upgraded audio system and navigation, is reasonably priced. The Black Edition is overpriced. Traditionally good resale value, but some complaints on 2017 and some early 2018 models regarding poor winter operation, engine failures and a lack of cabin heat in the winter are hurting resale values on the CR-V. The CR-V is an excellent lease value for 2022. 

Reliability
Numerous complaints on 2017 and 2018 models regarding gasoline contamination of the engine oil on some on some engines and poor heater output in cold weather. Honda claimed to have taken corrective action to address the problems for the 2019 model year but complaints are still being received. An extended powertrain warranty would be a prudent move for those not leasing a CR-V. 

Specifications


Body Style:  4SW
Occupants: 2/3
Engines:
1.5L-4 T(190 HP) 

Transmissions: CVT 
Drive Layout: Front-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*

City Fuel Economy: 8.7L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy:  7.4L/100 km

Active Safety Features: Standard forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, adaptive cruise control and lane keep assist. Optional blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors


Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000
Current Generation Debut:  2017
Country of Origin:  Canada, United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Headlight: M

 

NHTSA Rating:


2021 Hyundai Santa Fe 

 

NOT RATED

 

What’s new
Significant mid-cycle update including revised front and rear styling and a lightly revised side profile as well. Cabin updates include Nappa leather on the Ultimate trim, a new gauge binnacle, an available TFT gauge package, a 10.25 inch navigation screen and a wireless iOS-Android cellphone interface. The gear selector is the same non-mechanical type used in the current Sonata. Engine choices are new for 2021. The normally-aspirated 2.4 L four has stepped aside in favour of a new 2.5L engine, the previous 2L turbo has been replaced by the 2,5L turbo four that is finding it was under the hoods of many Hyundai-Kia-Genesis cars, and new for 2021 is a 1.6 L turbo hybrid. The eight-speed conventional automatic transmission used last year is hooked up to the 2.5L four, an eight-speed dual clutch automated manual is mated to the turbo and the hybrid sends its power to the wheels via a six-speed automatic. Revised suspension, including a new front subframe. The "out-of-car" parking assist, first introduced on the current Sonata, has migrated to the Santa Fe. The Ultimate gains a bizarre "Calligraphy" suffix for 2021. Active safety updates include a forward collision warning and autonomous emergency braking for pedestrians, cycling and will intervene if a turn looks like it will result in a collision. The Santa Fe is a very good lease value for 2021. 
Comments
The current Santa Fe follows Hyundai's move toward more barocque styling themes. The cabin is stylish, roomy and comfortable. The mainstream powerplant is a normally-aspirated 2.5L four, with a 2.5L turbo four and a hybrid combining the efforts of a 1.6L turbo four and any electric motor. A conventional eight-speed automatic transmission is hooked to the 2.5L, an eight-speed dual clutch automated manual is linked to the 2.5L turbo, with the hybrid powertrain mated to a six-speed automatic. Towing capacity ranges from 907 kilograms (2000 lbs.) to 1587 kilograms (3500 lbs.).  

Pricing
All-wheel drive is standard on all trims but the Essential, where it is a $2000 option. The Preferred, which adds blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors, a power driver's seat, dual-zone climate control, keyless go and forward collision warning, is a bargain. The Trend package on the Preferred adds leather upholstery, a panoramic roof and power passenger seat at a tempting price, and results in a car equipped to suit the wants of most buyers. There is a $9200 gap between the Preferred Trend and the Ultimate Caligraphy, of which about $6000 is attributable to additional equipment, with the balance devoted to the 2,5L turbo four. The power, features and finish of the Ultimate Caligraphy make it a viable alternative to vehicles like the Acura RDX. There are no pricing details yet on the hybrid variants of the Santa Fe.

Reliability
Not rated due to new powertrains. The Santa Fe should exhibit average to above average reliability during the warranty period. 

Specifications


Body Style:  4SW
Occupants: 2/3
Engines:
1.6L-4 T H(n/a HP), 2.5L-4 (191 HP)*, 2.5L-4T (277 HP)  

Transmissions: 8A* 
Drive Layout: Front-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*

City Fuel Economy:  10.6L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy:  9.3L/100 km
Active Safety Features: Standard forward collision warning, including pedestrians, autonomous emergency braking. Blind spot, rear cross traffic and lane departure warnings and adaptive cruise control with stop and go capability are optional, as is a turn intervention feature.

Warranty: 5/100,000
Current Generation Debut:  2019
Country of Origin: United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: n/r

Mod. Front: n/r

Side: n/r

Roof: n/r

Sm. Front Pass.: n/r

Head/Seat: n/r

Headlight: n/r

 

NHTSA Rating:


2022 Hyundai Tucson

 

NEW

What’s new
The fourth-generation Tucson arrives in spring of 2021. Built on an 86 mm longer wheelbase, the new Tucson is 155 mm longer overall than its predecessor. Two new engines, a normally-aspirated 2.5L four and a hybrid that combines a 1.6L four with an electric motor, are offered. A high-performance "N" line model is possible, as is a plug-in hybrid model.

Comments
Hyundai displayed the styling of the new Tucson in plain sight during the 2020 car show season in the guise of the super-radical T Vision concept. The styling of the new Tucson is essentially a four-door, slightly taller version of its very avant-garde concept car. Like the T Vision, the front of the new Tucson features a very wide grille that has segmented elements at its periphery that house the daytime running lights and head lamps. Very strong accent lines flow from the tops on the front fenders into the front doors and prominent style accent lines emanate from just above the front door handle to the back of the car. The most radical elements of the design are the two, forward-sloping, but non-parallel accent lines that run from the door handles down to the bottom of the doors. Like the current Elantra, Hyundai's design intent seems to be shock, rather than inspire "aahhs." The cabin has a strong horizontal emphasis, with a small gauge package (TFT in premium trims) and a large infoscreen integrated into the centre of the dashboard. Climate and audio controls rest below the infoscreen. The dashboard sweeps dramatically into the front door panels. A wireless version of the iOS-Android cellphone interface should be standard as will heated front seats, with ventilated front seats offered on premium trims.
Most Tucsons will be powered by a 187 horsepower 2.5L four that is working its way through the Hyundai lineup this year. It delivers decent power without the complexity of a turbo. The 2.5L is hooked up to a conventional eight-speed automatic transmission; with the hybrid powertrain linked with a six-speed automatic. 
Except for the base trim, where it is optional, all-wheel drive is standard on the 2022 Tucson. Standard active safety equipment includes a forward collision warning, including pedestrians and cyclists and a lane-keeping system. Blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors, active cruise control with stop and go and self-parking will likely be optional. Rear seat occupancy and unsafe exit warnings should be available, at least as options. No towing capacity details are available. 

Pricing

No pricing details are available at this time. 

Reliability
New car, not rated. The Tucson should exhibit average to above average reliability during the warranty period. 

Specifications


Body Style:  4SW
Occupants: 2/3
Engines:
1.6L H (n/a HP), 25L-4 (187 HP)

Transmissions: 6A, 8A 
Drive Layout: Front-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*

City Fuel Economy:  n/a
Highway Fuel Economy:  n/a
Active Safety Features: Standard forward collision warning with autonomous emergency braking and a lane keep assist system. Available blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings and adaptive cruise control.
Warranty: 5/100,000
Current Generation Debut:  2022
Country of Origin:  South Korea

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: n/r

Mod. Front: n/r

Side: n/r

Roof: n/r

Sm. Front Pass.: n/r

Head/Seat: n/r

Headlight: n/r

 

NHTSA Rating:


2021 Jeep Cherokee

 


 

 

What’s new
The Cherokee model range has been simplified with all trims, except for the Sport model. featuring all-wheel drive this year. The Overland model has been discontinued but the Altitude trim is new for 2021. An 80th Anniversary edition, to celebrate the founding of Jeep, is new.

Performance
Equipped with the 3.2L V6, the Cherokee is quick, quiet and economical. Other than being in too high a gear when exiting a corner, the transmission works very well. Steering, ride and handling are very well tuned for the Cherokee's intended "family hauler" role. Strong brakes. The cabin is impressive, with big gauges, logical controls, abundant soft-touch surfaces, comfortable seats and good space for passengers and cargo. Fuel economy with the V6 is virtually the same as it is with the 2.4L four and the V6 is well worth stepping up to as it transforms the vehicle in terms of performance and refinement.  

Comments
Based on the same platform that underpinned the now-discontinued Chrysler 200 and Dodge Dart, the Cherokee is the only one of the three models to have enjoyed any market success. So much so that Jeep elected to comprehensively update it last year rather than replacing it with an all-new generation of Cherokee. The frontal styling, which follows traditional Jeep cues, is a significant improvement over the visually discordant mess that fronted the model previously. Two engines, a 2.4L four with 180 horsepower and a 271 horsepower 3.2L V6 that have powered the Cherokee from launch were joined last year by a 270 horsepower 2L turbo four that debuted in North America under the hood of the Alfa-Romeo Giulia. With similar horsepower as the silky 3.2L V6, the rough and ready 2L seems pointless, especially as it is priced higher than the V6. The sole transmission is a nine-speed automatic. Three AWD systems Active Drive I, a single speed unit, Active Drive II, equipped a with a two-speed transfer case and Active Drive Lock, which adds a locking rear differential, are available. Optional active safety equipment includes adaptive cruise control, forward collision warning, lane departure warning, blind-spot monitoring and rear cross traffic detection.

Pricing
Except for the Sport, where it is a $2500 option, all trims feature all-wheel drive for 2021. The base engine for the Sport and North trims is a 2.4L four. The smooth 3,2L-V6 is standard on the Altitude, Trailhawk and Limted trims but is a $1995 option on the Sport and North models. The V6 is infinitely smoother than the four and is a real plus for buyers as it imbues the Cherokee with impressive refinement for a vehicle in this segment. The Fiat-derived, strong but noisy 2L turbo, is a $995 option on the Altitude and Limited trims. Given the impressive refinement of the 3.2L-V6, the 2 L-4 T seems like a pointless exercise. The North trim, which adds alloy wheels, deep-tint glass, a power driver's seat, fog lights and rear USB ports, is good value. The 80th Anniversary edition of the North adds leather seating, driver and passenger power seats, blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors and a number of other minor features, is well priced. Compared with a V6-powered North, the Altitude upgrade, with WiFi, Nappa leather upholstery and dual-zone, auto climate control, is a bargain, but many will be happy with the 80th Anniversary edition. The Limited trim upgrade adds Nappa leather, heated front seats and steering wheel and a power tailgate, at an attractive price. The Traihawk is the sole variant to feature the very capable Active Drive II system, which can cope with greater approach and departure angles and offers enhanced off-road performance, at the stroke of a pen. The Trailhawk Elite adds a number of luxury features at a good price. The Comfort Safety group, offered on the North and Altitude trims, features blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors, rear parking sonar, an alarm system and a number of minor items, for $1795. The Advanced Safety group, the a forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, a lane departure warning and a lane keep system, for just $695. The Technology group, offered on the Trailhawk and Limited trims, includes adaptive cruise control with stop and go, forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, lane departure warning, a lane keep assist feature and self parking, for just $1095. Limitations of the Jeep configurator make assessing lease value impossible.

Reliability
Predicted reliability is average to below average. The reliability of the new 2L gas turbo is unknown. An extended warranty from FCA Canada is recommended if you plan to kee the car past the three-year/60,000 km basic warranty.

Specifications


Body Style:  4SW
Occupants: 2/3
Engines:
2.0L- 4T (270 HP), 2.4L-4 (180 HP), 3.2L‑V6 (271 HP)*

Transmissions: 9A* 
Drive Layout: Front-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*

City Fuel Economy:  12.2L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy:  8.6L/100 km 


Active Safety Features: Optional forward collision warning with autonomous emergency braking, lane departure, blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors, a lane keep assist system and adaptive cruise control with stop and go.


Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000

Current Generation Debut: 2014
Country of Origin: United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Headlight: P

 

NHTSA Rating:


2021 Jeep Compass

 


 

What's new
Except for the base Sport trim, all Compass models feature all-wheel drive for 2021. An 80th Anniversary edition, celebrating the founding of Jeep, is available this year.

Performance
Hooked up to a nine-speed automatic transmission, the 2.4L four in the all-wheel drive North model driven by the APA accelerates with sufficient alacrity, cruises quietly and emits a pleasing rasp when extended. Though much maligned, the ZF supplied nine-speed automatic transmission works well-enough in this application and doesn't exhibit any bad behaviour. 
The steering of the Compass is nicely weighted, precise, quickly geared without being nervous, but is numb. The structure of the Compass feels quite stout and bumps are absorbed well and handling is stable and predictable. Driven briefly, the TrailHawk variant handled less precisely than the North and suffered from some nervousness from the steering at highway speeds. Outward visibility is less than panoramic and drivers are happy to have a rearview camera that aids reversing. 
The Compass pilot faces crisp, clear gauges and the logical touch screen and climate controls which are common to most current FCA vehicles, work as well here as they do elsewhereThe two-tone cabin treatment of our high-end Sport test vehicle, with elegant bright accents, is very nicely done. The all-black cabin of our TrailHawk model was drab and grim. Elegant looking and carefully assembled components make up the interior.  
The front seats are comfortable and there is plenty of legroom. The rear seat is sufficiently supportive and legroom is acceptable for a vehicle of this size. Cargo space is square and deep below the window line.

Comments
The Compass is built on the same platform than underpins its showroom mates, the Jeep Cherokee and Renegade. Power is provided by a 180 horsepower 2.4L four that is hooked up to a six-speed automatic transmission on the front-wheel drive Sport model, with all-wheel drive variants employing a nine-speed automatic. Two all-wheel drive systems, Jeep Active Drive, a full-time all-wheel drive that will suit most buyers and Jeep Active Drive Low, with a 20:1 crawl ratio, available for the more adventurous. The Trailhawk version adds Selec-Terrain which includes Selec-Speed control and Hill Descent control.

Pricing

All-wheel drive is standard on all models except for the Sport, where it is a $2500 option. Migrating from the Sport AWD to the North includes alloy wheels, fog lights, deep-tint glass, heated steering wheel, remote start, roof rails and variable wipers, and is very good value. The 80th Anniversary edition of the North adds leather upholstery, navigation, power front seats, USB ports for the rear seat and Wifi, at a bargain price. The 80th Anniversary model will suit the needs of a wide swath of buyers. Compared with the North, the Altitude upgrade, which adds WiFi, adaptive cruise control with stop and go, lane departure warning and a lane keep assist system, fog lights, navigation, leather seating, a two tone roof and two power front seats, is sold at a price lower than the value of the content. The Altitude has much of the equipment of the 80th Anniversary edition but does add important active safety equipment at a fair price. The range-topping Limited, with rain-sense wipers, an alarm system, blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors, self parking and an auto-dimming rearview mirror, is great value. The TrailHawk adds substantial off-road performance with a single tick of the order box. The Driver Assistance Group is priced at $1595 on the North and Altitude trims with the Advanced Safety Group priced at $995 on the Trailhawk and Limited models.
Limitations of the Jeep configurator make assessing lease value impossible. 

Reliability
Predicted reliability is below average. 

Specifications


Body Style:  4SW
Occupants: 2/3
Engines:
2.4L‑4 (180 HP)* 

Transmissions: 6M, 6A, 9A* 
Drive Layout: Front-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*

City Fuel Economy:  10.8L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy:  7.8L/100 km


Active Safety Features: Optional forward collision warning with autonomous emergency braking, lane departure, blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings as well as autonomous emergency braking and adaptive cruise control with stop and go


Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000
Current Generation Debut:  2017
Country of Origin:  Mexico

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Headlight: P

 

NHTSA Rating:


2021 Kia Seltos

 

What’s new
The all-new Kia compact crossover, bigger than its corporate cousin, the Hyundai Kona, but is smaller than the Kia Sportage. went on sale in mid-2020.

Performance

The 2L four the EX, all-wheel drive model, performs well and is very refined, except when pushed hard, when it becomes raucous. The CVT is very well matched to the engine and many drivers would easily be convinced that the transmission is a conventional hydraulic device. The Seltos exhibits a good balance of ride and handling, but is not the last word in precision. Steering is nicely weighted and precise but, like the handling, is uninvolving. Unless really pushed hard, when it loses its composure, the Seltos feels like a remarkably refined, well-sorted and refined car for the price. The cabin of the Seltos is a study in traditional elegance, which looks great, despite the use of large swaths of matte-finished, but hard plastics. The driver faces a crisply-marked gauge package and the audio and climate controls are so straightforward that they should be the templates other carmakers should follow. Seating is comfortable, front and rear and rear seat legroom is ample for adults and significantly better than the cramped quarters of the related Hyundai Kona. Though a bit shallow below the windows, the cargo space inside the Seltos is significantly better than it is in the Kona. For most buyers, the Seltos is a worthy and cheaper alternative to the Kia Sportage. 

Comments
While it took Kia almost two years to issue a companion vehicle built on the Hyundai Kona component set, Kia's response, the Seltos, finally broke cover during the 2020 car show season. Instead of just restyling the Kona, Kia massaged the Kona's underpinnings to fashion something larger and quite different than its Hyundai equivalent.
The base engine for the Seltos is a 146 horsepower 2L four, with a 175 horsepower 1.6 L turbo four found under the hood of the top SX trim. The 2L is hooked up to a CVT, with a seven-speed dual clutch automated manual transmission mated to the turbo. Front-wheel drive is offered on the base model with all other trims equipped with all-wheel drive.
The Seltos is fronted by a vaguely Subaru-like grille which blends well with clean and contemporary styling on the rest of the vehicle. 

Pricing
All-wheel drive is a $2000 option on the LX, but is standard on other trims. Moving up to the EX trim adds a sunroof, heated steering wheel, Keyless Go, remote start, forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, a lane keep assist system, blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings and a rear centre armrest, and is an outstanding bargain. The EX Premium, which includes L.E.D. headlights, navigation, wireless cellphone charging, heated rear seats, ventilated front seats, active cruise control and power front seats, is tremendous value. The SX, the sole version with the 1.6L turbo engine, also includes a Bose-branded audio system and heads up display; enough equipment to justify its $2000 surcharge but it also includes the turbo engine, making it great value. The Seltos is an excellent lease value for 2021. 

Reliability
New model, not rated. The Seltos should exhibit average to above average reliability during the warranty period.

Specifications


Body Style:  4SW
Occupants: 2/3
Engines:
2L-4 T (237 HP), 2.4L‑4 (181 HP)*

Transmissions: 6A* 
Drive Layout: Front-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*

City Fuel Economy:  8.8L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy:  7.6L/100 km
Active Safety Features:  Optional forward collision warning, including pedestrians, blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings, adaptive cruise control, a lane keeping system and adaptive cruise control
Warranty: 5/100,000
Current Generation Debut:  2021
Country of Origin:  South Korea

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Headlight: P

 

NHTSA Rating:


Next Page