2020 Lemon Aid New Car Reviews - Pickup Trucks

Once the purview of farmers and tradesmen, pickup trucks are now a popular transport mode for the typical suburban family. The advent of crew cab body styles, better driving performance, greater refinement and the proliferation of luxury features has resulted in a wide acceptance of pickup trucks as daily drivers for non-commercial users.  

There is litle new in the pickup field for 2020 except for refreshes for the Nissan Titan and the Toyota Tacoma.   

Chevrolet Silverado  Ford Ranger  Honda Ridgeline  RAM 1500 
Chevrolet Colorado  GMC Canyon  Jeep Gladiator  Toyota Tacoma 
Ford F-150 GMC Sierra  Nissan Titan  Toyota Tundra 

2020 Chevrolet Silverado, GMC Sierra

 

NEW

 

 

 

What’s new
The delayed six-cylinder turbodiesel engine is now available. 

Performance
The GMC Denali’s 6.2L V8 moves the truck with authority, but with perhaps an excess of vocal enthusiasm. Power is funnelled to the ground via a 10-speed automatic transmission that shifts smoothly enough but proves you can have too many gears, especially as the tuneful exhaust sonically accentuates each gear change. The Sierra’s nicely weighted steering is accurate considering it is a pickup. Handling is predictable and even though the truck features very basic suspension, including a live rear axle, ride is acceptably supple. The brakes are strong enough but braking effort is very high, the pedal has a wooden feel and is too close to the driver for ease-of-use.
Comments
Most of GM's dual nameplate pickup platform will be powered by a the familiar 5.3L and 6.2L V8 engines. The long-delayed 3L inline six-cylinder turbodiesel with 227 horsepower and a stout 460 lb.ft. or torque, finally became available for the 2020 model year. For this new generation of pickup, GM introduced a new 2.7L four-cylinder gasoline turbo engine that produces a stout 310 horsepower. It will eventually supplant the 4.3L V6 that is currently the base engine. Six, eight and 10-speed automatic transmissions are available depending on the engine and trim level of the truck in question.   
GM uses more aluminum in the new Silverado and Sierra, but has not moved to a complete alloy body like the current Ford F-150. That said, GM managed to shave about 200 kilograms off its pickups, about two thirds of what Ford saved by moving to an expensive all-alloy truck body, but at a lower cost and with fewer issues related to body repairs after a collision. 
Combined, GM's duo handily outsell the RAM 1500 pickup, but are comprehensively outsold by the Ford F150. Selling two versions of the same platform is an expensive way to market a product. Buyers are buying both the Silverado and Sierra nameplates in equal numbers.   
Pricing
Massive model range encompasses two namesplates, three body styles and a multitude of wheelbases and powertrain combinations. On the Silverado, the Regular cab is only offered in a basic, commercial-grade Work Truck trim that private buyers have no interest in. Four-wheel drive costs $4400 on the regular cab Work Truck. On the four-wheel drive 1LT long bed model, moving up from the Double Cab body style to the Crew Cab body will set you back $2000. On a Crew Cab with four-wheel drive, migrating from the WT to the Custom is priced to reflect the value of its additional equipment, like alloy wheels, carpeting and cruise contol, which make the Custom the defacto entry level Silverado for private buyers. The Custom Trail boss trim comes with Hill Descent Control, a trailer package, off-road Z71 suspension and skid plates, at a bargain price. The LT trim upgrade is also good value. The RST trim looks expensive for the equipment it brings. The LT Trail Boss trim upgrade is very expensive but the LTZ upgrade is a bargain. The range-topping High Country trim is significantly overpriced but results in a very comprehensively equipped truck. Even basic safety equipment such as blind spot, rear cross traffic and lane departure warnings, are optional on all but the top trim. On an LTZ model, if you want a full active safety package with a forward collision warning with low speed auto braking for objects and pedestrians, lane departure, blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors and a lane keep assist system, you must add the the $1260 Safety Package II and the $1095 Safely package. On an LT four-wheel drive Crew Cab, the 2.7L four-cylinder turbo is the base engine, the 5.3L-V8 is a $650 option, with the 3L six-cylinder diesel commanding a $6680 supplement. The Silverado-Sierra are spectacular lease values for 2020. 
Reliability
Not rated, new vehicle. The new 2.7L turbo four and inline six turbodiesel are new and unproven, as is the 10-speed automatic transmission. The 5.7L and 6.2L V8 engines appear to be reliable.    

Specifications


Body Style: Regular cab, extra cab and crew cab
Occupants: 2, 2/3, 3/3
Engines:
2.7L-4 T (310 HP), 3L-6 TDI (227 HP), 4.3L-V6 (285 HP), 5.3L-V8 (355 HP)*, 6.2L-V8 (420 HP)

Transmissions: 6A, 8A*, 10A* 
Drive Layout: Rear-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*
City Fuel Economy:  14.7L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy: 11.2L/100 km
Additional airbags: None

Active safety equipment:

Optional forward collision warning, including pedestrians, autonomous emergency braking, blind spot, rear cross traffic and lane departure warnings and adaptive cruise control


Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/160,000
Country of Origin: United States and Mexico

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: M

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: P

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Ford F-150

 


 

 

What’s new
The Co-Pilot360 active safety system is standard on Lariat and more expensive models. 
Comments
While the new F-150 may have a typical pickup look, it actually has a radical aluminum body that weighs less than other full-sized pickups. Like other pickups, the F-150 is offered in a vast variety of wheelbases, cargo bed lengths, body styles and powertrains. The base normally-aspirated 3.3L can be supplemented by a 2.7L V6 turbo, a 3.5L V6 turbo and a 5L normally-aspirated V8.  Rear-wheel drive is standard, with four-wheel drive optional.
The 2.7L V6 turbo is quick, flexible but sounds coarse when pushed. Nicely weighted and geared steering. Good ride and handling compromise for a truck that is used as a passenger vehicle but the truck quickly loses its composure when asked to tow anything. The new Peugeot-supplied V6 turbodiesel is smooth and delivers a good slug of torque. The brakes get their job done with little drama. Other than feeling lighter on its feet on the road, there is little sense of the F-150's radical body construction when you drive it. The F-150's cabin progressed a little when it was facelifted last year, but it still looks shabby compared with the cabins of the new RAM and Silverado/Sierra twins from GM. Range topping models feature sumptuous leather upholstery which co-exists uneasily with cheap hard plastic fittings common to all models. Regardless of its deficiencies, Ford seems to have a lock on this segment, with the F-150 outselling the RAM and GM's duo by a big margin. 
Pricing
Endlessly complex model range with Regular, Super Cab and Super Crew body styles available on different wheelbases and cargo box lengths. To migrate from rear-wheel drive to all-wheel drive on an XLT model costs $4500 on the Regular Cab, $4000 on the Super Cab and $4150 on the Super Crew body. Looking at 4WD versions of the F-150 in the popular XLT trim, moving up from the the single row Regular cab to the Super Cab with occasional seats in the second row, costs up to $3500. Migrating from a 4WD XLT Super Cab to a Super Crew, which has four forward full-size doors. costs $1650. Opting for the 163 inch wheelbase instead of the 145 inch wheelbase on a 4x4 XLT Super Crew model boosts the price by $3050. Moving up from the XL to the XLT trim, which brings popular equipment such as alloy wheels, carpeting, power windows, power locks with keyless entry and cruise control, is good value and delivers the truck miost people will buy. Compared with an XLT, the Lariat looks around $2000 overpriced compared to the equipment it contains. The King Ranch and Lariat trims are spectacularly overpriced, the Platinum is good value and the supplement charged to migrate from the Platinum to the Limited avoids any connection between price and value. The Peugeot-supplied 3L-V6 turbodiesel, with 250 horsepower and 440 lb-ft of torque is a pricey option--from $5150 to $8850--depending on the trim chosen. The 3.3L normally-aspirated V6 is hooked up to a six-speed automatic transmission but all other engines are linked to an automatic with ten speeds. On the four-wheel drive XLT Super Crew trim, blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors are a $650 option. The Ford Co-Pilot 360 active safety system, standard on Lariat and higher trims, includes the blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors and adds a pre-collision system with autonomous emergency braking and a lane keep assist system. Adaptive cruise control with stop and go is a $1750 option starting with the Lariat trim. The F-150 is a good lease value for 2020.  

Reliability
The aluminum body work may be more difficult to work on than a steel body, with higher parts costs as well as greater labour hours needed to put things right but insurance companies do not seen to be charging extra premium on the F-150. The reliability of the Ford V6 turbo (marketed as EcoBoost) has improved since 2016 but long-term durability is still uncertain. An extended powertrain warranty from Ford of Canada is recommended if you plan to keep your F-150 past the five year/100,000 km powertrain warranty. 

Specifications


Body Style: Regular cab, extra cab and crew cab*
Occupants: 2, 2/3, 3/3
Engines:
2.7L-V6 T (325 HP)*, 3L-V6 TDI (250 HP), (3.3L-V6 (290 HP), 3.5L-V6 T (375 HP and 450 HP), 5L-V8 (395 HP)

Transmissions: 6A, 10A*
Drive Layout: Rear-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*
City Fuel Economy: 13.1L/100 km
Highway fuel economy: 10.2L/100 km
Additional airbags: Standard
Active safety equipment: Optional forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings, a lane keep assist system and adaptive cruise control with stop and go.

Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000
Country of Origin:  United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: P

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Nissan Titan

 


 

 

What’s new
Mid-cycle update with numerous detail and packaging changes. Chief enhancements for 2020 include a new nine-speed automatic transmission that replaces the previous seven-speed and enhanced safety equipment, including standard lane departure, forward collision, blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings as well as intelligent emergency braking with pedestrian detection and rear intelligent emergency braking.  

Performance
A 5.6L V8 with 400 horsepower is the sole engine available on the 1500 version of the Titan. This engine provides ample power and torque but is on the noisy side. High fuel consumption. The new nine-speed automatic transmission should improve performance and reduce cruising fuel economy. Unladen, the rear suspension is very stiff, a long-time pickup truck failing that most other makers have at this point managed to eliminate. The suspension of the Titan smoothes out with a heavy load or when towing a trailer. Predictable steering, but some drivers found steering effort higher than expected at low speeds. Braking is very good but pedal effort is high. The multi-view camera on the APA's Titan tester delivers a great view of the vehicle and its environment, making this gigantic vehicle easier to place.

Comments
The Titan's cabin is dominated by a massive dashboard that seems to be part and parcel of vehicles in this segment. Logically arrayed and easy to operate controls. Large, comfortable and very welcoming front seats. The rear seat of the Titan is as roomy as that of GM's Silverado-Sierra twins but its seat is more comfortable.

Pricing
No 2020 pricing is available. 

Reliability
Not rated, insufficient data. Predicted reliability may approach that of GM's Silverado/Sierra twins. Nissan replacement parts prices are often surprisingly expensive and parts are less prolific from aftermarket sources than parts for U.S.-branded pickups. Some Nissans have been less resistant to corrosion than other makers. An oil-based anti-corrosion treatment is recommended.  

Specifications


Body Style: Extended cab, crew cab

Occupants: 2/3


Engines:
5.6L-V8 (400 HP)

Transmissions: 9A*
Drive Layout: Rear-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*

City Fuel Economy: 15.1L/100 km
Highway fuel economy: 11.1L/100 km
Additional airbags: No info available
Active safety equipment: Standard forward collision warning, including pedestrians, blind spot, rear cross traffic, lane departure and driver awareness monitors and autonomous emergency braking. Optional adaptive cruise control.  

Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/160,000
Country of Origin: United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: NR

Mod. Front: NR

Side: NR

Roof: NR

Sm. Front Pass.: NR

Head/Seat: G

Rear: NR

Headlight: NR

NHTSA Rating:


2020 RAM 1500

 

NEW

 

 

What’s new
The VM Motori 3L-V6 turbodiesel returns for 2020. Numerous packaging updates. 

Comments
Unlike GM’s new pickups which, to the casual observer, looks little different than their predecessors, the current Ram is notably different from what came before. The massive, visually intimidating bulk of the previous Ram has been replaced by a trim, sleek appearance. With a massive, Tesla-like screen in the middle of the dash, countless comfort and convenience features and supple leather seats, the Limited trim range-topper should called, “Imperial”, after Chrysler's once-storied high-end model. Seating is very comfortable and the amount of available cabin space is astounding. Powered by FCA’s 5.7L “Hemi” V8, the Ram gathers speed quickly and cruises quietly, but like many pickups, exhaust noise is intrusive when running hard. The eight-speed automatic ably harnesses the V8’s power. Equipped with air suspension, the Ram delivers a supple ride for a pickup. 
Engine choices include the popular 3.6L Pentastar V6, this time equipped with a mild hybrid system which FCA calls eTorque. The belt-driven eTorque mechanism provides 90 extra lb.ft. of torque on launch. The conventional 5.7L-V8 returns, but an eTorque version of it, which produces 130 more lb-ft. of torque on launch, is optional. The revised 3L-V6 turbodiesel has been revised and is, according to FCA, reliable.    

Pricing
Moving up from rear-wheel drive to four-wheel drive will cost buyers $4000. On four-wheel drive models, swapping a Quad Cab body for the long-bed Crew Cab body style will set you back $21000. The 5.7L V8 is a $1900 option on variants where the V6 is standard. The eTorque version of the V8 is priced $995 higher than the conventional version. The 3L turbodiesel is priced $3900 higher than the 5.7L-V8. On a V8-powered, 144 inch wheelbase, Crew Cab, four-wheel Ram 1500, moving up from the base Tradesman trim to the Bighorn, which includes carpeting, alloy wheels and plusher trim, is priced to reflect the additional content and creates a truck to suit the needs of most buyers. The A62 and A63 options package are very good value and with A63, there is really no reason to move up to another trim level. Compared with the Big Horn, the sport-themed Rebel looks overpriced. The Laramie and Longhorm balance price and content precisely. The top-of-the-range Limited model is sumptuously equipped and delivers a lot of content for the money.  

Reliability
New vehicle, not rated due to insufficient data. Predicted reliability is average. Avoid the optional air suspension as it has proven troublesome (especially in winter), fails prematurely and is very expensive to repair. The previous iteration of the turbodiesel was unreliable. An oil-based anti-rust treatment is recommended.

Specifications


Body Style: Regular cab, extra cab and crew cab
Occupants: 2/3
Engines:
3L-V6 TDI (260 HP), 3.6L-V6 (305 HP + 90 lb.ft. launch torque, standard), 5.7L/100 km (395 HP + 130 lb.ft. launch torque, optional)*

Transmissions: 8A*
Drive Layout: Rear-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*

City Fuel Economy: 16.1L/100 km
Highway fuel economy:  11.5L/100 km
Additional airbags: None
Active Safety Equipment: Optional forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, blind spot, rear cross traffic and lane departure warnings, adaptive cruise control with stop and go and a lane keep assist system 
Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000
Country of Origin: United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: G

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: M

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Toyota Tundra

 


 

 

What’s new
Revised trims and equipment for 2020. 

Performance
The Tundra's 5.7L V8 is strong and flexible but is noisy; with its exhaust system being excessively loud. Good handling overall but the rear suspension can become unstable and some steering wheel shimmy can be felt when in all-wheel drive mode. The automatic transmission works very well in normal driving but needs to downshift frequently to maintain momentum when driven hard. The Tundra's ride is stiff and bouncy when lightly laden but smoothes out with a load in the tailgate or when pulling a trailer. Good brakes. Good visibility.

Comments
Sales of the Toyota Tundra pale in comparison with those of its domestic-branded rivals. IIHS crash test ratings well behind other trucks in its segment. 

Pricing
The base rear-wheel drive double cab model is offered primarily to advertise the lowest possible MSRP. Moving from the base model to the four-wheel drive SR5 trim, will set you back $7460. The CrewMax body, with four forward-hinged doors, costs as extra $1020 on the SR5 and $2870 on the TRD Pro. Toyota has embraced active safety and all versions of the Tundra are equipped with the Toyota Safety-Sense P system. Active cruise control, lane departure warning, forward collision warning, including pedestrians, with autonomous emergency braking, are all standard. Blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors are standard on high end variants of the Tundra. 

Reliability
Very good reliability. The Tundra's mechanical elements have been around for years and are reliable. Previous generations of the Tundra were vulnerable to rust, with frames, brake and fuel lines experiencing premature rusting. An oil-based anti-rust treatment is recommended. 

Specifications


Body Style: Access (extended) cab, Crew (Double) cab.
Occupants: 2/2, 2/3
Engines:5.7L (381 HP)*
Transmissions: 6A*
Drive Layout: Rear-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*
City Fuel Economy: 18.2L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy: 14.2L/100 km
Additional Airbags: Knee airbags for both front occupants
Active Safety Equipment: Standard forward collision warning, including pedestrians, autonomous emergency braking, adaptive cruise control and a lane departure warnings. Optional blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings 
Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000
Country of Origin: United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: M

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: A

Sm. Front Pass.: P

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: M

NHTSA Rating:


Midsize Pickups

2020 Chevrolet Colorado/GMC Canyon

 


 

 

What’s new
GM's Colorado/Canyon twins are essentially unchanged this year but will have a short model year as GM is readying an early-release 2021 update on the trucks. 

Performance
The Colorado and Canyon are more pleasant day-to-day driving trucks than its previously closest competitor, the Toyota Tacoma. The 3.6L V6 delivers better mid-range response than the V6 in the Toyota Tacoma but is slightlier noisier and is heavy on fuel. The eight-speed automatic transmission upshifts well but needs a firm nudge to generate a downshift. Nicely weighted steering. The optional 2.5L turbodiesel is both noisy and pricey. Reasonable ride quality for a body-on-frame truck with a live rear axle. 

Comments
Though referred to as midsize, GM's duo and the two other competitors in the segment, the Ford Ranger and Toyota Tacoma, would have been considered fullsize a decade ago. Available body styles include an extended cab, with rear flipper doors and vestigial rear seats and a crew cab with four forward hinged doors. The crew cab body style is offered in two different cargo bed lengths. Three engines, a 200 horsepower 2.5L four, a 305 horsepower 3.6L V6 and 2.8L turbodiesel four with 181 horsepower and a stump-pulling 369 lb-ft of torque, are offered. Two automatic transmissions, a six-speed with the gasoline and diesel fours and an eight-speed with the V6, are available. Rear-wheel drive is standard, with four-wheel drive optional regardless of engine.

Pricing
On the Chevrolet Colorado, moving up from an extended cab to a crew cab body on four-wheel drive V6 models costs an additional $1100. On a rear-wheel drive crew cab short box LT Colorado, swapping the 2.5L four for the optional V6 costs $1500. Four-wheel drive is priced $5600 more than a V6-powered rear-wheel drive LT variant of the crew cab, short box body. On the 4x4 crew cab V6 variant, migrating from the Colorado WT to the LT results in a truck equipped to suit private buyers, with features a power accessories group and alloy wheels, at a price supplement that reflects the value of the additional features. Migrating up to the Z71 trim includes heavier duty off-road components and a variety of comfort and convenience features that is reasonable value if you want the more capable driveline. The ZR2 adds leather seating, a trailering package and a spray-in bedliner, but is significantly overpriced. The 2.8L turbodiesel commands a $6830 supplement over the V6 on the LT trim level of the four-wheel drive crew cab body. The base Canyon is priced $700 more than the Colorado WT, with the four-wheel drive, diesel-powered GMC Denali priced $1300 more than a Colorado ZR2, but the Denali is slightly more luxurious than the Chevrolet. Forward collision and lane departure warnings are available starting with the Colorado LT at $780. No advanced active safety equipment such as autonomous emergency braking and adaptive cruise control is offered on this platform. The Colorado and Canyon are spectacular lease deals for 2020. 

Reliability
Not rated, incomplete data. Two of the three engines (the 2.5L four and 2.8L turbodiesel) and the eight-speed automatic transmission are relatively recent. The eight-speed automatic transmission has had some issues on other vehicles it is installed in. An extended powertrain warranty is recommended on trucks equipped with the 2.8L turbodiesel if the truck is to be kept longer than the powertrain warranty. GM dropped its powertrain warranty from five years/160,000 kms to five years/100,000 kms for the 2019 model year.  

Specifications


Body Style:  Extended cab, crew cab
Occupants:  2/3
Engines:
2.5L-4 (200 HP), 2.8L-4 TD (181 HP), 3.6L-V6 (308 HP)*

Transmissions: 6A, 8A*
Drive Layout: Rear-wheel drive, four-wheel drive*
City Fuel Economy:  14L/100 km
Highway City Economy: 9.9L/100 km
Additional airbags: None
Active safety equipment: Optional forward collision and lane departure warnings.

Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000
Country of Origin: United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: A

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: M

NHTSA Rating:


 

2020 Ford Ranger

 

NEW

 

 

What’s new
No changes of note for 2020. 

Comments
Previously a compact, the Ranger has adopted a mid-size configuration to compete with GM's successful Canyon/Colorado twins as well as Toyota's Tacoma. Ford's 2.3L EcoBoost turbo four is the only powerplant available and hooks up to a 10-speed automatic transmission. Both crew cab and extra cab body styles are available.
Driven briefly, a Ranger XLT SuperCrew proved to be a pleasant road companion. Though very loud while accelerating, the turbo four provides abundant urge and recedes into the background while cruising. The ten-speed automatic does its job without fuss and doesn't hunt between gears as some multi-geared automatics can. The Ranger's structure feels very stout and there are none of the squeaks and rattles that accompany trips in many pickups. The Ranger rides well for what it is, a pickup, but handling, while steady, is not compelling in any way. Steering is reasonably accurate and nicely weighted. The brakes do their job but the pedal is too soft to inspire confidence. The Ranger proved to be a capable performer on a challenging off-road course experienced. Given its high price, more money should have been spent on the cabin of the Ranger. The instrumentation looks downmarket and there are a lot of hard plastic surfaces inside the truck. The front seats are comfortable, but they are mounted low and combine with the shallow side windows to make the drive feel slightly buried. The climate controls feature a lot of small buttons, which make dealing with them while driving less than ideal.  

Pricing
Even the base SuperCab XL model features a high power 2.3L turbo four, four-wheel drive and a 10-speed automatic transmission. Even the base truck is expensive. Moving up from the XL to the XLT brings along commonly expected features such as alloy wheels, full carpeting, cruise control, power locks with keyless entry, parking sensors, alarm system, the Ford 360 safety system with blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors, lane keep assist and Pre-Collision assist with automatic emergency braking, at a price much lower than the value of the content included. An XLT SuperCrew, with four conventional front hinged doors, is priced $1800 higher than a SuperCab of the same trim. The Lariat range-topper, offered only in SuperCrew form, includes luxuries such as leather seating, power driver's seat, Keyless Go and L.E.D. headlamps, as well as a plethora of minor comfort and convenience features,  at a tempting price. The Ranger is a spectacular lease value for 2020.  

Reliability
New vehicle, not rated. Unproven 2.3L turbo four and 10-speed automatic transmission. 

Specifications


Body Style: Extended cab, crew cab
Occupants: 2/3
Engines:
2.3L-4 T (270 HP)

Transmissions: 10A 
Drive Layout: Four-wheel drive
City Fuel Economy:  11.8L/100 km
Highway City Economy: 9.8L/100 km
Additional airbags: None

Active safety equipment: Standard forward collision warning, including pedestrians and autonomous emergency braking. Optional blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors and adaptive cruise control

Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000


Country of Origin:  United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: A

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: M

NHTSA Rating:


 

2020 Honda Ridgeline

 


 

 

What’s new
A nine-speed automatic transmission replaces the previous six-speed unit. 

Comments
Though the original Ridgeline was perceived as a marketing failure in some circles, it sold over 3400 units in Canda last year. However, the Toyota Tacoma, the dominant truck in this segment, sold over 12,000 examples in 2019.  
Honda dropped the unique styling of the first Ridgeline for a conventional pickup appearance that gives no hint of its unibody design. The crew cab body of the new Ridgeline shares a lot of elements with the related Honda Pilot and its cabin is Pilot derived as well. Rear seat space in the Ridgeline is competitive for a midsize pickup. Storage space is ample, including an area under the rear seats that can accommodate golf bags. With the rear seat cushions rotated rearward to rest vertical against the backrest, Ridgeline owners can carry a few bicycles right in the cab with them. The tailgate once again features a drop-down/swing-out tailgate and the under-floor storage bin that were popular with owners of the previous Ridgeline. Trivia alert, Honda notes that the whole bed-liner on top-end versions of the truck is a gigantic, waterproof speaker. Except for its 81 mm (3.2 inches) greater width and marginally higher roof, the Ridgeline is smaller in all other key dimensions than popular Toyota Tacoma. At 714 kilograms, the payload of the new Ridgeline is slightly higher than that of the conventional body-on-frame Tacoma. Towing capacity is around 2272 kg (5009 lbs.) versus up to about 2950 kg (6503 lbs) for the Tacoma. Many pickup trucks are bought as family vehicles now and the Ridgeline, with the look and a lot of the utility of a truck with the driving pleasure of a crossover, is what most families need but often avoid because the preception is that you need an old-school body-on-frame truck if you want a real truck. 

Pricing
Even the base Ridgeline is well equipped, including the Honda Sensing active safety suite that lacks only blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors. Moving up from the Sport to the EX-L adds leather seating as well as enough additional comfort and convenience items to justify its higher price. The Touring upgrade includes navigation, upgraded audio equipment and blind spot and rear cross traffic monitors as a price that reflects the value of the extra equipment. The Black Edition doesn't seem to offer anything to justify its additional expense. The Ridgeline is a spectacular lease value for 2020.

Reliability
Above average reliability for the engine and conventional six-speed automatic transmission used in the Ridgeline. 

Specifications


Body Style: Crew cab
Occupants: 2/3
Engines:
3.5L-V6 (280 HP)

Transmissions: 9A* 
Drive Layout: Front-wheel drive, all-wheel drive*
City Fuel Economy:  12.6L/100 km
Highway City Economy: 10L/100 km
Additional airbags: None
Active safety equipment: Standard forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, lane departure warning, lane keep assist and adaptive cruise control. Optional blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings.
Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/160,000
Country of Origin:  United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: A

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: P

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Jeep Gladiator

 

NEW

What’s new
Absent from the pickup market for around 30 years, Jeep returns with the Gladiator, a name it used on a pickup it sold from 1964 to 1987.
Comments
While the Gladiator looks like a Wrangler Unlimited pickup and shares its propulsion units with its showroom mate, it is underpinned by a unique chassis created to maximize its potential as a pickup. Built on a 490 mm (19.3 inch) longer wheelbase, the Gladiator is 754 mm (29.6 inches) longer overall than a Wrangler Unlimited. The 152 mm (60 inch) cargo bed is nearly 13 mm (5 inches) shorter than found in most crew cab pickup trucks. 
Subtle Gladiator design differences compared with the Wrangler Unlimited include wider grille slots to permit the better cooling necessary by the increased tow capacity of the Gladiator, as well as passenger cabin and a cargo bed unique to the pickup. The cabin can accommodate four adults in reasonable comfort, but accessing the interior via small doors with high sills on a truck that is so far off the ground, is a challenge. Its convertible top makes the Gladiator unique in the pickup truck segment. The Gladiator is offered with a soft top, with a hard top, or with both tops. Like the Wrangler Unilimited, the Gladiator employs aluminum for its hinged panels, including the windshield. 
Power stems from FCA's ubiquitous 3.6L-V6, now with a stop-start system. Jeep has announced that the VM Motori 3L-V6 turbodiesel that has an unenviable reputation for mechanical fragility in other FCA vehicles, will be available at some point in the future. Power reaches all four wheels via either a six-speed manual transmission or an eight-speed automatc. Properly equipped, the Gladiator can tow up to 3649 kg (8044 lbs.).

Pricing
The base Gladiator, the Sport S, is equipped in a similar way to the Wrangler Sahara Unlimited. Migrating up to the Overland adds popular equipment, running boards, LED cabin lighting and a 120V inverter, is reasonably priced. For $3000 more than an Overland, the off-road oriented Rubicon is equipped with heavy-duty axles, disconnecting anti-sway bars and off-road friendly shock absorbers. The Sport and Rubicon models are delivered with a soft top as standard equipment with dual tops available for an extra $2395. On the Overland, the dual top option costs only $1420 because the hard top is already standard. The Gladiator is a spectacular lease value for 2020.  

Reliability
New vehicle, not rated. Below average reliability predicted. New Jeep products have a history of numerous problems in the years surrounding their launches. Avoid the V6 turbodiesel once it becomes available in the Gladiator as it has been unreliable in other FCA models. An FCA Canada extended warranty is recommended if you plan to keep the vehicle past the three year/60,000 km basic warranty. 

Specifications


Body Style:  Crew Cab 
Occupants:  2/3
Engines:
3.6L-V6 (285 HP)

Transmissions: 6M, 8A*
Drive Layout: Four-wheel drive

City Fuel Economy:  13.7L/100 km

Highway Fuel Economy: 10.7L/100 km

Additional airbags: None

Active safety equipment: Optional forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, blind spot and rear cross traffic warnings

Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000
Country of Origin: United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: NR

Mod. Front: NR

Side: NR

Roof: NR

Sm. Front Pass.: NR

Head/Seat: NR

Rear: NR

Headlight: NR

NHTSA Rating:


2020 Toyota Tacoma

 


 

 

What’s new
Minor styling resivsions and numerous package and packaging updates for 2020. An iOS-Android cellphone interface that is now standard on all Tacomas. Four-wheel drive and a V6 engine are universal equipment on the Tacoma this year. TRD models are now have a Premium Audio system which includes an embedded navigation system.  

Performance
The Tacoma's 3.5L V6 lacks torque below 3000 rpm, and accelerates in a leisurely fashion when pulling a trailer. The manual transmission on our TRD test unit was hampered by a long-travel gearchange and a heavy clutch that make urban driving less pleasurable than it could be. The Tacoma's ride is turbulent when unladen; morphing to overly compliant at other times. Steering is imprecise and is can be a challenge to keep the truck travelling in a straight line. Unlike its on-road behaviour, the Tacoma's suspension is very supple and capable off road. Braking effort is difficult to modulate and the truck dives in hard stops, but overall stopping performance is competitive within its segment.    
Comments
In a market segment where identity is important, the Tacoma is instantly recognizable as a Toyota truck. The Tacoma's cabin is practical and useable but its design is blocky and cabin materials are distressingly cheap looking. Cabin access is hampered by a high door sill and a low roof due to a cabin that is shallow from the floor to the roof. The front seats are comfortable but the seats are mounted low to the floor and the seating position is oddly similar to that of a sporty car. The rear seat is also mounted close too the floor but legroom in the Double Cab is reasonable for this segment.

Pricing
A bewildering number of variants that defy any logical marketing plan. Moving from an Access Cab to a Double Cab on the regular load bed variants costs only $1000. The TRD Off Road is very good value. The TRD Premium, TRD Off Road Limited and the TRD Off Road Pro are conspiciously overpriced. There are few deals or tempting incentives on the Tacoma but resale value is exceptionally strong. Good value leasing. 

Reliability
The Tacoma has retained rear drum brakes which are more durable than rear discs. Previous Tacomas have suffered from rusty frames, so an oil-based anti-rust treatment is strongly recommended.

Specifications


Body Style:  Extended (Access), crew cab (Double cab)
Occupants:  2/3
Engines:
3.5L-V6 (278 HP)*

Transmissions: 6M, 6A*
Drive Layout: All-wheel drive*

City Fuel Economy:  13L/100 km
Highway Fuel Economy: 10.5L/100 km

Additional airbags: Dual front knee airbags


Active safety equipment: Standard forward collision warning, autonomous emergency braking, adaptive cruise control and lane departure warning. Optional blind spot monitor 

Warranty: 3/60,000, 5/100,000
Country of Origin: United States

IIHS Ratings:

Sm. Front Driver: G

Mod. Front: G

Side: G

Roof: G

Sm. Front Pass.: A

Head/Seat: G

Rear: G

Headlight: P

NHTSA Rating: